Archive for February, 2010|Monthly archive page

You can’t be a change agent if you’re an expert …

Well, you can, but it’s tough.

When you’re on the early part of the learning curve others look at you and say:

“Hey, it’s Darren. If he can do I can do it.”

Once you hit a certain level of competence or expertise they same people look at you and say:

“Hey, it’s Darren. He can do it, I can’t.”

Did you hear the change in tone in the first part of each of those statements?

Neophytes can be models of change for people new to learning something different. Experts have a different aura about them. That aura of expertise is intimidating for neophytes. The aura of “not quite an expert”, the sense of newness associated with someone learning something they’ve just learned, is motivating for newbies.

We need less experts, more neophytes. Actually, a constant influx of neophytes to provide a continuous stream of models to engage new learners.

What are the implications of this for change agents? What about teachers; because aren’t all teachers change agents for the stuff they teach?

Managing Complex Change

This graphic sums it up brilliantly:

Managing_change

I first saw it in a presentation on SlideShare by Silvia Tolisano, Shifting to 21st Century Learning, and tracked it back Andrew Churches outstanding wiki. I have to think some more about how this dovetails with the ideas of change and the Cynefin Framework Clarence and I talked about in our presentation Scratch Best Practice, It's All About Beta Baby! that we gave at Alan November's 2009 Building Learning Communities Conference.

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